Solidarity stories from the Yugoslav wars: from Marzabotto/Bologna to Glasgow

Advanced Research Centre, Room 237c and atrium
11 Chapel Ln, Glasgow G11 6EW
Free

Step free access to the event. The event takes place in room 237c and surrounding area (atrium) which are located on the ground floor of the Advanced Research Centre (ARC). You can find more information on accessibility at the venue here.

This event is for 16+, children between 12 and 16 with accompanying adults. Although the exhibition and accompanying roundtable focus on civic engagement and solidarity networks, the traumatic experiences of war and displacement, as well as the rise of xenophobic attitudes and socio-political opposition to welcoming refugees, are likely to be discussed during the event. These may create emotional discomfort for some of the participants.

Activism/Campaigning Community Celebration Talk/Workshop

What can we learn by comparing the different experiences of activism and social-political understanding of the Yugoslav wars in Italy and Scotland in cities like Glasgow and Bologna? Our event offers a unique opportunity to weave together the rich (hi)stories of civic activism during this period and the displacement it generated in Marzabotto (a small town in the Italian region of Bologna) in the 1990s with the those of Glasgow. We invite you to join us on a fascinating photo exhibition and interactive guided tour drawing on archives held in Marzabotto/Bologna that has documented Marzabotto activism at this critical moment of solidarity histories. This will be followed by a round table with participants from the wider community including academics and activists, to discuss their experiences and reflect on the legacies of key episodes of solidarity and activism, tracing their enduring impacts on our collective consciousness today. We will also present some video-interviews of protagonists of the Marzabotto/Bologna solidarity network.

For queries about the event’s content, please contact Sara Bernard (sara.bernard@glasgow.ac.uk) and Teresa Piacentini (teresa.piacentini@glasgow.ac.uk)